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Welcome to The City Topic. In this blog you will find news, analysis, opinions and many more themes about cities and urban developments around the world. 

The Author

My name Fabian Lozano and I am an architect with master's degree in urban design. During the last years, I have travelled to different places in Latin America and Europe, from the fascinating landscapes of Rio de Janeiro to the marvellous historic cities of Italy. I believe that every place always has something to teach us, not only in its physical part, but also in the culture and lifestyle of the people.

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